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Building Enclosure Archives - Page 5 of 9 - Morrison Hershfield

CAC RCI: Architectural Sheet Metal Flashing Design

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Russell Raymond, Senior Building Science Consultant and Regional Manager, is co-presenting Architectural Sheet Metal Flashing Design on April 20 in partnership with the Chicago Area Chapter (CAC) of RCI.

This is a full-day session. Registration begins at 7 a.m., the program will run from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Session Overview:
Are you faced with durability and performance challenges with flashing?  Doing it right the first time can save you from expensive repairs or replacement.  Register for the Chicago Area Chapter of RCI’s upcoming Educational Program on Architectural Sheet Metal Flashing Design with Russell Raymond of Morrison Hershfield. Benefit from their decades of experience in architectural sheet metal fabrication, installation, design, and assessment across North America.

Who should attend?
This session will communicate the fundamentals and more advanced topics suitable for architects, engineers and building envelope consulting professionals.

Subject Matter
Topics include material selection, attachment, joinery, expansion joint detailing, fabrication tolerances, drainage assemblies and penetration flashings.  Within sheet metal joinery, the subjects of proper soldering techniques, proper solder repair procedures and the application of specific metal joinery types are developed fully.

Session Details
This full-day session takes place on April 20, and provides a hands-on feel with many “how-to” examples on fabrication and installation for the entire building envelope.  Educational credits are available.
The program will run from 8 am to 5 pm with registration beginning at 7 am.   Register

Educational Credits Available:

  • 8 Continuing Educational Hours (CEHs) from RCI.
  • 8 Learning Units (LUs) from the American Institute of Architects.
    Approved for Health Safety and Welfare credit.

About the Presenter:
Mr. Russell Raymond, RBEC, RRC, REWC, RWC, RRO, CIT, CEI, CDT, GRP
Senior Building Science Consultant, Morrison Hershfield
Russell is a Registered Building Envelope Consultant, Registered Roof Observer, Certified EIFS Inspector, a Certified Tile Roofing Installer, Certified Level 1 Infrared Thermographer, and a Construction Documents Technologist.  He is also the 2014 winner of the RCI Volunteer of the Year Award.
He has over 27 years of international experience in the sheet metal contracting and building envelope consulting industries. His experience includes designing and specifying roofing and sheet metal systems for major oil refineries, museums, and hospital systems. He has assessed and inspected installations by others on numerous projects spanning the Gulf Coast, throughout the United States, and international projects. He has performed numerous investigations pertaining to sheet metal, roofing and waterproofing, as well as cladding and glazing failures.

BEST5 Conference: Drainage Capabilities and Heat Loss of Different Inverted Roof Assemblies

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Derek Budde, Building Science Consultant, is presenting Drainage Capabilities and Heat Loss of Different Inverted Roof Assemblies at this year’s BEST5 Conference in Philadelphia, PA. This presentation is based on the research conducted and published by Derek and Morrison Hershfield’s Matthew Pel. The session will take place at 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 18.

Presentation Overview:
Energy use in buildings throughout North America has attracted significant attention over the past decade. In cold marine climates, rainwater management is also a critical aspect of the building enclosure and energy performance. Various drainage practices used for low slope inverted roofing are often designed without quantified data available regarding the cold rain affects on the thermal performance of the systems.
The effect of cold water under the roof insulation and its impact on the effective thermal performance in inverted roofs is well researched. The aim of this project was to develop a better understanding of the impact of cold rain events on the effective thermal performance of inverted roofs in an effort to develop
best practice inverted roofs design guidelines.

Getting to Zero National Forum: Holistic Approach to Achieving Zero Energy High-Rise Residential Buildings

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Building Energy Specialists, Patrick Roppel and Christian Cianfrone will jointly present Holistic Approach to Achieving Zero Energy High-Rise Residential Buildings at the 2018 Getting to Zero National Forum, in Pittsburgh, PA  on April 17-19, 2018. This session will take place at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, April 18.

Presentation Overview:

As codes and standards evolve towards ultra-low or net-zero energy buildings, the practicality of achieving these targets in multifamily, especially high-rise concrete construction gets increasingly challenging. The need for multifamily buildings are becoming more common as cities redevelop and add density. Current design and construction practice for high-rise in particular present a number of constraints including water, energy and sufficient solar with regards to achieving high levels of energy performance. The outcome of these combined constraints is often poor energy efficiency, with the burden of higher operating costs deferred to future owners. This talk explores the interconnected need for efficiency across all aspects becoming the primary consideration in residential buildings and what that will likely mean for the typical competing constraints.

2018 NASCC: Mitigating Thermal Bridging in Steel Construction

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Neil Norris, Building Science Engineer, is presenting Mitigating Thermal Bridging in Steel Construction at this year’s NASCC: The Steel Conference, in Baltimore. He is presenting this session twice during the conference, on April 11th at 11:15 a.m. and on April 12th at 4:45 p.m.

Presentation Overview:
Current trends in energy codes are pushing the building construction industry towards greater energy efficiency. A big part of this shift is through reducing heat loss through the building envelope by minimizing thermal bridging. However, steel construction often dictates thermal bridging through the envelope due to structural requirements. There are a growing number of solutions, whether they are proprietary or on site approaches, that can help mitigate these heat loss impacts. In this session, we will discuss how thermal bridging impacts building energy performance in steel construction and how it can be mitigated, through cases and worked examples.

Prospec 2018: Passive House and Commercial Construction

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Medgar Marceau, Principal / Senior Building Science Engineer, is presenting Passive House and Commercial Construction: The Evolution of Residential Passive House Building Standards and the Application to Commercial Construction at this year’s CSI Puget Sound Prospec Conference!  This session is a part of the main seminar event and will take place at 3:00 p.m. on April 10.

Presentation Overview:

The accelerating growth of Passive House across the US and Canada is leading a change in the building envelope industry across the Pacific Northwest. With Vancouver’s new mandate to meet the Passive House standard for all city-owned commercial buildings, and Seattle’s progressively stricter energy codes, it’s only natural that our industry will have new challenges and opportunities to meet on the path to sustainability.

There is a large knowledge base of how to build durable residential buildings that meet the Passive House standard; however, there are few examples of commercial buildings meeting Passive House. This presentation will help bridge the knowledge gap between residential and commercial construction. Basic principles of Passive House are high levels of insulation, no thermal bridging, an airtight building, very high-performance windows and doors, heat and moisture recovery ventilation, and optimizing solar heat gains. All of this while ensuring occupant comfort and durability are paramount. Achieving these objective in Passive Commercial will require the same.

This presentation will discuss:

  • Acknowledging the challenges in translating Passive House to Passive Commercial
  • Solutions for minimizing thermal bridging in commercial construction
  • Solutions for an air-tight interior vapor retarder
  • Thermally efficient at-grade and below-grade transitions
  • Using 2-D and 3-D simulation tools to evaluate hygrothermal performance
  • Impact of 3-D Passive House Envelope Details on whole-building energy use

Portland BEC: A Case History of ETFE on Recent Projects

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Stéphane Hoffman, Vice President / Senior Building Science Specialist, will be presenting A Case History of ETFE on Recent Projects for the Portland Building Enclosure Council (BEC) April Meeting.

Presentation Overview:

ETFE, the fluorocarbon-based polymer ethylene tetrafluoroethylene, is quickly gaining popularity in North America and being used on some of the continent’s most prominent projects. ETFE was developed for architectural purposes in the 1970s, and since that time, mainstream use of ETFE in construction projects has been largely limited to Europe. The material has many attractive attributes that provide not only a new aesthetic quality, but also potential cost savings. Weighing in at roughly one percent of the weight of glass, significant reductions in structural costs are made possible by employing ETFE. Despite these great potential benefits, the material is not an equal substitution to glass or other roofing systems in many respects. Through review of material characteristics, performance modeling, and multiple case studies of current ETFE installations, the authors will discuss lessons learned, limitations, as well as the benefits of the material from the perspective of building science implications.

AIA Utah: Pushing the (Building) Envelope

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Morrison Hershfield’s Rick Ziegler, Building Science Regional Manager, will be a panelist at AIA Utah’s March session titled Pushing the (Building) Envelope: Case Studies and Best Practices.

Build better. Build smarter. Learn how analysis of architectural components will bring better value to your clients, your project, and your understanding of how to meet a building envelope performance goal. Karen Ferguson, AIA, of VCBO will moderate a discussion with Roman Buys, PE (VBFA) and Rick Ziegler, PE (Morrison Hershfield.). Don’t miss it!

 

Facade Tectonics World Congress 2018: 4 Papers, 3 Presentations

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We’re excited to announce that our Building Science Team has had 4 papers accepted and will be presenting 3 sessions at this year’s Facade Tectonics World Congress in Los Angeles.

Presentations include:

Quantifying the Benefit of Venting Glazed Spandrels to Reduce Glass Breakage and Control Moisture
Presented by Julien Schwartz, Building Energy Consultant, and co-authored with Stéphane Hoffman, Patrick Roppel and Neil Norris

Tuesday, March 13th – 10:30 am
Watt Hall 1

Presentation Overview:

While venting glazed spandrels is cited to be a benefit to control heat buildup, several instances of spontaneous glass breakage in spandrel insulated glazing units, attributed to thermal stress, have been reported in vented spandrel cavities used with an opacifier on the inside glass surface. The implication is that if venting is not an effective solution to reduce thermal stress and the associated need for higher strength glass, then it is desirable not to vent to avoid dirt buildup on the inside glass surface as it cannot be cleaned. The benefit of venting or weep holes must also be evaluated in terms of condensation risk and damage.

The objective of this paper is to address questions related to the real need to vent spandrel sections to control heat buildup. This paper covers a field study that includes monitoring spandrel sections with a combination of single- and double-glazing, three different venting scenarios, and both clear- and opacified-glass scenarios. The data collected will be used to calibrate 3-D thermal and CFD simulations. The computer simulations will allow for cross-validation of the field monitoring data and broaden the relevance of the findings through the investigation of other conditions including different spandrel designs, venting scenarios, and climates.

The field monitoring suggests that venting the spandrel cavity has little to no impact on reducing thermal stress in clear-glass double-glazed spandrel sections, and a limited impact in clear-glass single-glazed spandrel sections. With the higher solar absorption associated with an opacifier coating, venting shows even less impact on reducing thermal stress, with some data suggesting an adverse effect. Also, in the temperate climate of this field study, the condensation risk was found to be very low regardless of the venting configuration. Based on these preliminary results, there is reason to question the need to vent double-glazed spandrel sections. The 3-D thermal and CFD model is currently being calibrated and findings will be presented in a subsequent paper. Preliminary simulations results show good agreement with the field monitoring data.

 

Vintage Vinyl: Lock-strip Gasket Replacement and Remediation
Presented by Mike Plewacki, Senior Building Science Consultant

Monday, March 12th – 8:30 am
Watt Hall 1

Presentation Overview:

Mid-century through 1980’s buildings with lock-strip or “zipper-gasket” glazing systems are an ever present part of the urban landscape in many cities across North America. Although these systems are considered outdated by many and seldom used in new construction, the systems have performance attributes that should merit respect.

For many in the façade community, lock-strip gasket facades are often dismissed as a system to be removed and replaced with modern aluminum curtain wall. While this may be practical in certain situations, it is far from the only option available and not always the right option for the owner’s budget or maintaining the original architecture of a building.

Lock-strip facades continue to endure but age has taken its toll on the functionality of what was once a revolutionary glazing system. By maintaining the lock-strip gasket façade and upgrading glazing when possible, building performance can be restored or even increased as retrofit technology improves.

Remedial options are available for a lock-strip gasket façades that focus on preserving and maintaining the primary elements and appearance of the system from simple remediation efforts such as the installation of exterior “wet-seals” to limit air and water infiltration, to complete replacement and reglazing.

Improved curtain wall performance (reduced air infiltration, lowered solar heat gain and improved acoustical performance) are achieved by introducing modern insulating glass with a low-e coating and emerging technologies, such as vacuum insulating glass (VIG), present possibilities for replacement of an original monolithic glazed system for increased energy performance. Reglazing also provides the opportunity to increase spandrel insulation, or change the aesthetic of the façade by introducing (or removing) existing spandrel panels.

While the benefits of the above are appealing, lock-strip gasket replacement projects are not immune to challenges. As with most remediation projects there are technical considerations to address.

 

Fully Tempered Glass in Spandrel Applications: Assessing the Residual Strength after Inner Light has Shattered
Presented by Stéphane Hoffman, Vice President / Senior Building Science Specialist

Tuesday, March 13th – 8:30 am
Stauffer Hall 200

Presentation Overview:

Recent years have seen an increase use of insulated glazing units (IGUs) in spandrel applications to visually blend the appearance between the vision and spandrel glass. There has been instances of glass breakage for this type of design attributed to thermal stress. Recent study indicate that IGUs in spandrel application see higher thermal stress than with traditional single glazed spandrel and that venting the spandrel cavity does little to minimize this increase in thermal stress. Recent research supports the theory that the increased in thermal stress is leading to breakage of the inner light due to lowered strength in heat strengthened ceramic opacified glass.

In response to this phenomenon considerations are being given to using fully tempered glass for the inner light when using a ceramic frit opacifier. The later raises interesting questions regarding the performance of the glazing in the event of a failure of the inner light. While fully tempered lights have a long history of use in IGUs for safety reasons, it is not uncommon to have the occasional incidence of spontaneous breakage. However, in vision glazing units these failures are readily apparent and promptly addressed. In spandrel applications, the failure of a fully tempered inner light may go unnoticed. This raises questions as to how much residual strength a unit with a shattered inner light would have to resist wind loads. The result of testing of structurally glazed IGUs with a fully tempered inner light that has been shattered demonstrated the residual strength was sufficient to resist an initial application design wind loads. The results provide guidance to designers considering the use of fully tempered glass in spandrel applications.

 

PAPER – Silicone Spandrel Glass Opacifiers: Mitigating Glass Breakage Risk from Thermal and Other Stresses
Co-authored by Stéphane Hoffman, Vice President / Senior Building Science Specialist, and George Torok, Senior Building Science Specialist – this session will be presented by a representative outside of Morrison Hershfield

Monday, March 12th – 8:30 am
Watt Hall 1

Presentation Overview:

Curtain wall design commonly uses insulating glass units for vision and spandrel glazing to provide better visual harmonization of building façade glass. Risks with this design approach include higher thermal stresses, especially when low-emissivity coatings are used on insulating glass units in spandrel areas. Ceramic enamel frit – commonly used to opacify spandrel glass – is known to induce a bending strength reduction of up to 50%. The ability of ceramic enamel frit coated glass to resist thermal stress is similarly reduced. Multiple incidences of thermal stress related fracture have occurred with heat-strengthened, ceramic enamel frit opacified spandrel glass. An increased chance of spontaneous breakage, by nickel sulfide inclusions, may occur if ceramic enamel frit opacified spandrel glass is fully-tempered to withstand the thermal stresses that it is exposed to.
Silicone spandrel glass coatings have been examined as a solution to prevent the strength reduction in heat-treated glass when ceramic enamel frit is applied as an opacifier. Four-point bending tests were used to investigate the flexural strength of coated heat-strengthened and fully-tempered glass. Ball drop testing was used to investigate the impact resistance of coated fully-tempered glass.

AIA Seattle Sustainable Design Series: Passive House and Commercial Construction

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AIA Seattle’s Corporate Allied Partners (CAPs) enliven the AIA Seattle community and value involvement with AIA Members.

This year, Medgar Marceau, Building Science Engineer, will present Passive House and Commercial Construction at AIA Seattle’s Sustainable Design Series. The series is a full-day workshop with 7 sustainable-design presentations.

Medgar’s presentation will begin at 10:40 a.m. and is eligible for one AIA LU|HSW credit.

Presentation Overview:

The accelerating growth of Passive House across the US and Canada is leading a change in the building envelope industry across the Pacific Northwest. With Vancouver’s new mandate to meet the Passive House standard for all city-owned commercial buildings, and Seattle’s progressively stricter energy codes, it’s only natural that our industry will have new challenges to meet on the pathway of sustainability. There is a large knowledge base of how to build durable residential buildings that meet the Passive House standard. However there are few examples of commercial buildings meeting Passive House. This presentation will help bridge the knowledge gap between residential and commercial construction. Basic principles of Passive House are high levels of insulation, no thermal bridging, an airtight building, very high-performance windows and doors, heat and moisture recovery ventilation, and optimizing solar heat gains. All of this while ensuring occupant comfort and durability are paramount. Achieving these objectives in Passive Commercial will require the same.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the challenges in translating Passive House to Passive Commercial
  • Examine solutions for: A) minimizing thermal bridging in commercial construction; B) providing an air-tight interior vapor retarder
  • Discuss thermally efficient at-grade and below-grade transitions
  • Utilize 2-D and 3-D simulation tools to evaluate hygrothermal performance

Greenbuild 2017: Energy in LEED today and tomorrow

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Christian Cianfrone, Building Energy Specialist, will present Energy in LEED Today and Tomorrow on Thursday, November 9 at 9 a.m.

Presentation Overview:

Discussions about the water-energy nexus have reignited conversations about energy impacts and consumption. Presenters will use real-world examples to show how unique building and space types have successfully implemented and documented their energy impacts and performance. During this session, we will delve into how LEED addresses energy today through LEED v4 and through pilot credits and also take a look towards how today’s trending topics, like the water-energy nexus impact LEED’s future goals.

Learning Objectives:

  • Provide an overview of how LEED v4 addresses energy in all rating systems – LEED BD+C, ID+C, O+M, ND and Homes – and related credits.
  • Review different strategies for achieving the LEED v4 energy-related credit across all LEED rating systems.
  • Review real world examples of how LEED energy-related credits and strategies have been applied.
  • Discuss the future of energy issues, solutions and strategies and the impact they have on the development of future LEED credits and pilot credits.